GOP meetings went into the night Thursday, looking for a way to get the bill through to the Senate; Keystone XL to be approved; SEC takes to Sweet 16; and more headlines to start your day Friday, March 24,2017.

WASHINGTON — After seven years of fervent promises to repeal and replace "Obamacare," President Donald Trump and GOP congressional leaders buckled at a moment of truth Thursday, putting off a planned showdown vote in a stinging setback for the young administration.

 

The White House insisted the House vote would still happen — Friday morning instead — but with opposition flowing from both strongly conservative and moderate-leaning GOP lawmakers, that was far from assured.

 

 

AP SOURCES: US TO APPROVE KEYSTONE XL PIPELINE

 

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration will approve the Keystone XL pipeline on Friday, senior U.S. officials said, ending years of delay for a project that has served as a flashpoint in the national debate about climate change.

 

The State Department will recommend the pipeline is in U.S. interests, clearing the way for the White House to grant a presidential permit to TransCanada to build the $8 billion pipeline, two officials said. It's a sharp reversal from the Obama administration, which rejected the pipeline after deeming it contrary to national interests.

 

 

SEC TAKES ITS SPOT IN THE SWEET SPOLIGHT

 

The Southeastern Conference, widely know as a football power, will be on full display Friday during the NCAA Tournament.

 

Three of the night's four games will feature an SEC team. Florida, South Carolina and Kentucky will play in separate games, but the night will tip with the only game not featuring an SEC team when North Carolina takes on Butler at 6:09 p.m. Eastern.

 

 

FLORIDA HOUSE PASSES BILL THAT GIVES TERRORISM VICTIMS RIGHT TO SUE

 

The House unanimously approved the measure (HB 65) on Thursday. It would allow victims of terrorist attacks, such as the Orlando Nightclub massacre, to recover damages of at least $1,000 and attorney's fees.

 

Current law only allows victims of specific criminal activity to do so, and many acts of terrorism don't fall under the legal umbrella.